Snow White Must Die( Bodenstein and Kirchhoff #4) by Nele Neuhaus

15793103

Book Description

Publication Date:January 15, 2013
Snow White Must Die by Nele Neuhaus is a tremendous new contemporary mystery series and huge international bestseller—with more than 3.5 million copies in print!
Snow White Must Die” was published in Germany in 2010 and has been a bestseller in Europe. It’s easy to see why. Nele Neuhaus has a flair for the ominous and the ornate. Her primary setting, the village of Altenhain, makes those secretive villages in Agatha Christie novels seem as harmless as a collection of gingerbread houses. Altenhain is the anti-Christie town: Instead of quaintness, it offers decay; instead of Miss Marple, there’s a spiteful populace of voyeurs whose curiosity stokes the smoldering embers of violence.

On a rainy November day police detectives Pia Kirchhoff and Oliver von Bodenstein are summoned to a mysterious traffic accident: A woman has fallen from a pedestrian bridge onto a car driving underneath. According to a witness, the woman may have been pushed. The investigation leads Pia and Oliver to a small village, and the home of the victim, Rita Cramer.

On a September evening eleven years earlier, two seventeen-year-old girls vanished from the village without a trace. In a trial based only on circumstantial evidence, twenty-year-old Tobias Sartorius, Rita Cramer’s son, was sentenced to ten years in prison. Bodenstein and Kirchhoff discover that Tobias, after serving his sentence, has now returned to his home town. Did the attack on his mother have something to do with his return?

In the village, Pia and Oliver encounter a wall of silence. When another young girl disappears, the events of the past seem to be repeating themselves in a disastrous manner. The investigation turns into a race against time, because for the villagers it is soon clear who the perpetrator is—and this time they are determined to take matters into their own hands.

An atmospheric, character-driven and suspenseful mystery set in a small town that could be anywhere, dealing with issues of gossip, power, and keeping up appearances.

Review –

Though the book started out a bit slow it quickly picked up speed and I found it very hard to tear myself away.

I chose the audio version and the narrator made it a very enjoyable journey.

I rated it five stars ***** because of the story plot, the huge variety of characters and the tangled relationships between all of them.

If you’re looking for a great “who dun it” look no further – I HIGHLY recommend SNOW WHITE MUST DIE.

 

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The Book Thief

Synopsis

An incredible young adult novel about how a young girl’s love of books helps a community survive World War II and the Holocaust.

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, this groundbreaking novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist—books. This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

“Zusak has created a work that deserves the attention of a sophisticated teen and adult readers…a mesmerizing and original story.”—School Library Journal, starred review“A tour de force to be not just read but inhabited.”—The Horn Book, starred review

Review-

Whoa, I thought I had finished this review a long time ago but I found it today in the DRAFT folder.

This turned out to be one of my favorite books of all time.   The narrator did a fantastic job which made the audiobook so much more enjoyable than it would if I had tried to pronouce all the German words.  The story is moving, the characters well developed and I laughed and I cried and when it was over I just had to sit still for awhile to let it all sink in.

I highly recommend this book.

The Book Thief by Markus Zasak

From School Library Journal

Synopsis: Grade  9 and Up–Zusak has created a work that deserves the attention of sophisticated teen and adult readers. Death himself narrates the World War II-era story of Liesel Meminger from the time she is taken, at age nine, to live in Molching, Germany, with a foster family in a working-class neighborhood of tough kids, acid-tongued mothers, and loving fathers who earn their living by the work of their hands. The child arrives having just stolen her first book–although she has not yet learned how to read–and her foster father uses it, The Gravediggers Handbook, to lull her to sleep when shes roused by regular nightmares about her younger brothers death. Across the ensuing years of the late 1930s and into the 1940s, Liesel collects more stolen books as well as a peculiar set of friends: the boy Rudy, the Jewish refugee Max, the mayors reclusive wife (who has a whole library from which she allows Liesel to steal), and especially her foster parents. Zusak not only creates a mesmerizing and original story but also writes with poetic syntax, causing readers to deliberate over phrases and lines, even as the action impels them forward. Death is not a sentimental storyteller, but he does attend to an array of satisfying details, giving Liesels story all the nuances of chance, folly, and fulfilled expectation that it deserves. An extraordinary narrative.–Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA
 
 
Review-    I had been wanting to read this book for a very long time when I ran across the audio book version in our public library and decided to check it out.  Let me just say that I loved it.  Making Death the narrator was genius and the person reading the story, Allan Corduner, did an extraordinarily good job.  I always listen to my audio books while in the car and I had to stop a time or two on the last cd because of the tears in my eyes.  The book is excellent and should be read by young adults and adults too.