The Call (The Call #1)by Peadar O’Guilin

Book Description:

Published: August 30, 2016

Format: Free Digital Book/OverDrive

Imagine a world where you might disappear any minute, only to find yourself alone in a grey sickly land, with more horrors in it than you would ever wish to know about. And then you hear a horn and you know that whoever lives in this hell has got your scent and the hunt has already begun.

Could you survive the Call?

Review –

I have long been a fan of Karen Marie Moning and her Fever series, which deals with MacKayla (Mac) Lane and her battle against the world of the Fae, so when I ran across this book I knew I had to read it.

I’ve seen it described on YouTube as a horror novel and the video went on and on about how graphic and gruesome it was, but in reality it’s no worse than what young adults see on video games or read in some graphic novels. I found the violence and description of the Grey Land and the monstrous Faeries and their dress (made of human skin) added to the trepidation and edginess of the book.

Vanessa (Nessa) Doherty is a 14-year-old girl who attends Boyle Survival College, one of many in Ireland that serve only to teach its youth how to survive the Call of the Sídhe.

This intense, riveting tale is set in an Ireland that the Sídhe, Irish faeries, have cut off from the rest of the world, plotting to retake their former home through a grim war of attrition that involves kidnapping human teenagers. During the “Call,” teens disappear “for a little over three minutes, but in [the faeries’] world, the Grey Land, an entire day has passed, panic and pain in every second of it.” When the stolen teens reappear, they are usually dead and/or horribly mutated by magic. All Irish children attend special centers where they’re taught martial arts, the Sídhe language, and total ruthlessness. Nessa, already relegated to crutches due to polio (Ireland’s isolation means no imported vaccines—or anything else), seems unlikely to survive her Call, but has dedicated everything to doing so. The author follows several teens, including Nessa, over into the Grey Land, delivering blisteringly fast-paced and graphic descriptions of the tortures the children endure. This is a bleak, gripping story, one where only the most muted of happy endings is possible. 

There is a semi cliffhanger and the sequel, The Invasion, comes out in March of 2108. I can’t wait.

Five stars!!!!!

 

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

Book Description

October 13, 2009
Hopelessly crossed in love, a boy of half-fairy parentage leaves his mundane Victorian-English village on a quest for a fallen star in the magical realm. The star proves to be an attractive woman with a hot temper, who plunges with our hero into adventures featuring witches, the lion and the unicorn, plotting elf-lords, ships that sail the sky, magical transformations, curses whose effects rebound, binding conditions with hidden loopholes and all the rest.
Review –
Even though I had the audio book of this story I found it difficult to get through. I really don’t know what the problem was-maybe the fact that I don’t like stories involving Faeries had something to do with it, but I almost celebrated when I finished it.
If fairy tales are your thing then you will like it, but I only gave it a three stars out of five.  Don’t hate me.
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Exile by Karin Perry

DESCRIPTION

Millie, a faerie living in exile after a failed rebellion, attempts to survive the Queen’s assassins with the help of a vampire named Slade.

LENGTH

85,352 words

About 285 pages

Ballad: A Gathering of Faerie by Maggie Stiefvater

Book Description: Remember us, so sing the dead, lest we remember you James Morgan has an almost unearthly gift for music. And it has attracted Nuala, a soul-snatching faerie muse who fosters and then feeds on the creative energies of exceptional humans until they die. James has plenty of reasons to fear the faeries, but as he and Nuala collaborate on an achingly beautiful musical composition, James finds his feelings towards Nuala deepening. But the rest of the fairies are not as harmless. As Halloween—the day of the dead—draws near, James will have to battle the Faerie Queen and the horned king of the dead to save Nuala’s life and his soul.


Review –

 

“Faeries” is such a nice sounding word-why is it then that the majority of them are wicked, hateful, mean and dangerous?

I really enjoy this author’s writing style – she switches point of view from chapter to chapter so that you can see the same situation from two different characters . I enjoyed both books in this series.

Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris

Product Description

With her knack for being in trouble’s way, Sookie witnesses the firebombing of Merlotte’s, the bar where she works. Since Sam Merlotte is now known to be two-natured, suspicion falls immediately on the anti-shifters in the area. Sookie suspects otherwise, but her attention is divided when she realizes that her lover Eric Northman and his child” Pam are plotting to kill the vampire who is now their master. Gradually, Sookie is drawn into the plot-which is much more complicated than she knows…
 
 
 
 
Review-
 
Loved it and can’t wait for the next one.  Too bad authors can’t be cloned and write twice as fast.  Oh well, it just makes for more enjoyment.
 

Lament by Maggie Stiefvater

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Sixteen-year-old Deirdre Monaghan, a gifted harpist who regularly plays for weddings and other events, has the kind of stage fright that makes her physically ill before a performance, which is an inauspicious way to start a romance; but while vomiting before a competition she meets a gorgeous boy who comes into the restroom to hold her hair. He is Luke Dillon, a flautist who proceeds to accompany her in a truly stellar performance. As four-leaf clovers start appearing everywhere, Deirdre develops telekinetic powers and encounters strange, unworldly people who seem to bear her ill will. Her best friend, James, also a talented musician; her beloved grandmother; and her mother all are in danger, as Deirdre is targeted by the queen of Faerie. Deirdre eventually discovers that she is a cloverhand, a person who can see the denizens of faerie, and Luke, not the only immortal who has her in his sights, is a gallowglass, an assassin assigned by the queen of Faerie to kill Deirdre but who falls in love with her instead. This beautiful and out-of-the-ordinary debut novel, with its authentic depiction of Celtic Faerie lore and dangerous forbidden love in a contemporary American setting, will appeal to readers of Nancy Werlin’s Impossible (2008) and Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series. Illustrations by Jeffrey are fitting. Grades 9-12. –Diana Tixier Herald
 
Review –
 
I normally do not like books about Faeries but this one I did, so much so, that I’ve already  checked out the follow-up from my local library.   Now I have to finish some other books before adding another one to the stack.  Can’t wait.
 
 

Fragile Eternity by Melissa Marr

Product Description

 

Fragile Eternity, Melissa Marr’s sequel to the New York Times bestselling Wicked Lovely and Ink Exchange, returns to Huntsdale, where faeries and mortals intermingle, wreaking continual havoc on each other’s lives. Aislinn, who became a faerie in the first book, now has to deal with the awkward–verging on impossible–position of still being in love with her mortal boyfriend Seth, whom she can’t even touch without burning. To complicate things further, as the new Summer Queen, Aislinn is eternally bonded to Keenan, the Summer King, and the attraction between them is palpable and constant. In the doomed loves that permeate these books, Marr deftly explores the essence of longing as she questions notions of fated love. Her characters are strong, with even the nastiest of the faerie troublemakers coming through as absolutely compelling and sympathetic. And their situations are rife with conflict, from the impossible mortal-faerie relationships to the ancient familial and courtly spats within the faerie realm.  Heidi Broadhead –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 

 

 Review-

 

I think the moral of this installment of the Wicked Lovely series is “Be careful what you wish for-because you just might get it”.  That’s what Seth is finding out and I can’t wait to read the next book but it’s checked out at the library so I have to be patient until it’s back on the shelf.

 

 

Ink Exchange by Melissa Marr

From Booklist

Newcomers and returning readers alike will devour this companion novel to Marr’s ragingly popular Wicked Lovely (2007). The new peace between the Summer King and the Winter Queen isn’t good for everyone: those of the Dark Court, who feed on faeries’ destructive emotions, are dangerously weakened. Irial, King of the Dark Court, needs a solution, and he finds one in the Summer Queen’s mortal friend Leslie. Tormented by memories of abuse, Leslie wants nothing more than to reclaim her body by getting a tattoo, but the enchanted design she selects provides Irial with a direct link to mortals’ emotions. The tattoo binds Leslie and Irial together even as a third faerie works to prevent their destructive yet seductive connection. All of Marr’s characters are complex, defying easy description and evoking sympathy and horror in equal measures, and all cast a thrall that will leave readers willing to forgive plotting that can be difficult to follow. This dark fantasy about survival and transformation is as mesmerizing as its urban faery subjects. Grades 10-12. –Krista Hutley –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
  
  
  
Review-
 
Just now finished this book and I loved it .
 I know the story wouldn’t have turned out the same but I truly think that realistically Ash(the Summer Queen) should have told her mortal best friend, Leslie, about the faery world and the dangers lurking around every corner instead of  just trying to protect her.   I mean if you knew something that would give your best friend as edge to remaining safe and knowledgable about the dangers around her, wouldn’t you tell her.  I would.  But, regardless, I loved this book and look forward to the next one.

Faery Rebels (Spell Hunter) by R. J. Anderson

Synopsis

Forget everything you think you know about faeries. . . .Creatures full of magic and whimsy?Not in the Oakenwyld. Not anymore. 

Deep inside the great Oak lies a dying faery realm, bursting with secrets instead of magic. Long ago the faeries mysteriously lost their magic. Robbed of their powers, they have become selfish and dull-witted. Now their numbers are dwindling and their very survival is at stake.

Only one young faery—Knife—is determined to find out where her people’s magic has gone and try to get it back. Unlike her sisters, Knife is fierce and independent. She’s not afraid of anything—not the vicious crows, the strict Faery Queen, or the fascinating humans living nearby. But when Knife disobeys the Faery Queen and befriends a human named Paul, her quest becomes more dangerous than she realizes. Can Knife trust Paul to help, or has she brought the faeries even closer to the brink of destruction?

Review-

Okay, it now looks like I’m hooked on faeries and I never thought that would happen. I can understand Knife’s frustration in having to stay inside all the time.  It would drive me up a wall.  I would very much like to have a clan (or whatever they go by) of faeries live in a tree in my backyard but the Oklahoma heat might be too much for them. Anyway, I enjoyed the book so much I have the library  fixed to call me when the next installment become available.

Wicked Lovely by Melissa Marr

From The Washington Post

Melissa Marr adds elegantly to the sub-genre of Urban Faery with this enticing, well-researched fantasy for teens. Wicked Lovely takes place in modern-day Huntsdale, a small city south of Pittsburgh whose name evokes the Wild Hunt of mythology. High school junior Aislinn and her grandmother have followed strict rules all their lives to hide their ability to see faeries because faeries don’t like it when mortals can see them, and faeries can be very cruel. Only the strongest faeries can withstand iron, however, so Aislinn prefers the city with its steel girders and bridges. She takes refuge with Seth, her would-be lover, who lives in a set of old train carriages.But now Aislinn is being stalked by two of the faeries who are able to take on human form and are not deterred by steel. What do they want from her?

One is Keenan, the Summer King, who has been looking for his Queen for nine centuries, bound by the rules and rituals that govern his quest. The other is Donia, a victim of those rules, consigned to the role of Winter Girl when she failed Keenan’s test, yet still in love with him. Certain that Aislinn is the woman he must marry, Keenan shows up as a charismatic new student at her high school, unaware that she sees his true form. He’s determined to court her and is puzzled by her rebuffs. Suddenly, none of the rules that have kept Aislinn safe is working anymore, but things aren’t going as Keenan expects either. Both will have to change, make startling compromises and enlist surprising allies if they want to break free from the wicked game that has ensnared them.

Their greatest challenge will be to avoid the fatal traps laid by Keenan’s mother, the Winter Queen. She will lose her power if Keenan finds his mate, and she will do anything to stop this. Unfortunately, she’s a little too over the top to be totally threatening, a campy version of Hans Christian Andersen’s Snow Queen — part Disney witch, part Endora in “Bewitched.” But this didn’t stop me from devouring the book.

Marr creates a fully realized world that conveys the details and the politics of faery life. The suspense remains taut, as the point of view shifts between Aislinn, Keenan and Donia, allowing the reader to develop sympathy for all of them. Marr’s lyrical language and sensual imagery capture both the confused emotions and the physicality of adolescence.

The romantic scenes are delicious. The fantasy of being pursued by two young men is alluring in itself, but when one is a pierced and tattooed sexy outsider and the other is a blindingly beautiful King of Faery, how much better can it get? Halfway through the book, I knew which characters I wanted to end up together, and that made me read greedily on. Readers will beg for a sequel.

Copyright 2007, The Washington Post. All Rights Reserved. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 

Review-
I haven’t read very many books concerning Faeries but I must say I enjoyed this one so much that I requested the next installment in the series from my library. Since someone else has it checked out for now I will make do reading another book about Faeries-maybe  I have found a new genre to add to my collection of favorites.