The Night Bird (Frost Easton #1) by Brian Freeman

Book Description:

Published: February 1, 2017

Format: Audio/Audible

Homicide detective Frost Easton doesn’t like coincidences. When a series of bizarre deaths rock San Francisco—as seemingly random women suffer violent psychotic breaks—Frost looks for a connection that leads him to psychiatrist Francesca Stein. Frankie’s controversial therapy helps people erase their most terrifying memories…and all the victims were her patients.

As Frost and Frankie carry out their own investigations, the case becomes increasingly personal—and dangerous. Long-submerged secrets surface as someone called the Night Bird taunts the pair with cryptic messages pertaining to the deaths. Soon Frankie is forced to confront strange gaps in her own memory, and Frost faces a killer who knows the detective’s worst fears.

As the body count rises and the Night Bird circles ever closer, a dedicated cop and a brilliant doctor race to solve the puzzle before a cunning killer claims another victim.

Review –

Just finished this book and loved it. This is a “first read” of this author and I WILL be reading more.

It’s a murder mystery involving a serial killer targeting patients of a psychiatrist who helps people overcome bad memories by totally erasing them. So, would you let someone mess with your head to get rid of a horribly bad memory? I don’t have any memories that horrible so I say “No”, but I can see where it might be a good thing for those with debilitating memories. 

Frankie Stein (hokey name, but in this storyline it works) is the psychiatrist and several of her patients are being reprogrammed to kill themselves or others by someone who hates her because she let a guilty man go free. 

She is married but the marriage is slowly falling apart and she has a hateful sister. I felt bad for her and hope that she may reappear in future books with a brighter story.

The character of Frost Easton is a new favorite of mine because of his human-ness. He’s kind, caring and has a brother who is a chef but owns a food truck and a sister who was murdered. He rescued a cat when it’s owner died and hence inherited the house of said cat. He can live there for as long as the cat is alive. He’s a police homicide detective, who in the book, works mostly alone, rarely calling for back-up unless it’s a dire situation. This to me was the most unrealistic part of the book, because in real life that just doesn’t happen.

The story is fast-moving, action packed and filled with surprises.  It was a great read and I look forward to the next installment of the Frost Easton series.

 

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